Oh For Crying Out Loud, Really?

Watch this and then ask yourself how many times you go to a store and only buy two or three things.

How about you let me know when you can do that with an entire cart load that fills up the trunk of a car and then has the cart follow me out to the parking lot like these newfangled robot luggage thingies I keep seeing?

That shouldn’t be too hard to scale up for you geniuses.

12 thoughts on “Oh For Crying Out Loud, Really?

  1. How many times do I get two or three items? None. Ever.

    I like those suitcases that follow you and how it got out of the way of that one woman but they better recognize your handprint so someone doesn’t just grab it and go the other way while you’re not looking.

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  2. It’s Japan, big-city Japan where they do stuff really different. Some people DO just buy a few things at a time, for each day. For one thing, they’ve got very little storage in their matchbox apartments.

    Also, the Japanese are into weird shit….

    I’m with SiG on the robo-luggage and theft.

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  3. It most likely will not be long now, since the populace is getting lazier by the minute, where yo will simply be a food processor. You will not have to work cause gubmynt will provide all your income, the grocery will deliver food to you, your appliances will do all the prep work, the robots will bring the food to you and even put it in your soup cooler, you will not even have to leave the shitter. You will have become the ultimate food processor, just chews and shit. Thats what your life will become.

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  4. You’re overlooking the obvious:
    It’s not easier for you, that’d be stupid.
    It’s easier for them, because it just eliminated 27 blue-haired Millennial douchebags who no longer draw a paycheck at Random Retailer Inc., which just saved the store manager at each such outlet $810,000/yr.

    And just to be perverse, they’ll increase prices anyways, and tell you they did it because of “the cost of automation”.

    I do stores like that, with 20 self-serve kiosks, and 0-1 actual cashier/checkers, especially on a weekend when the store is crowded, a big favor: I get the biggest cart I can find, fill it to overflowing, leave it in a random aisle, and then walk away without checking out.

    6,8, maybe 10 times/week.

    Bonus points if they have perishable products at the bottom of the pile.
    Double bonus if the perishables melt all over other high-priced items.

    You want to make a profit off of making my life more convenient? Welcome to America. Here’s my debit card.
    You want to charge me more for making your life more convenient? Rot in hell, @$$hole.

    Next week’s lesson: Fun, profit, and chaos with bar codes.

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  5. In Europe most city-dwellers stop and buy tonight’s supper on the way home from work. North American shopping habits were shaped by two factors, our severe winters and many bodies of water meant a plentiful supply of ice to preserve food – my mother grew up with an ice-box that was replaced by a refrigerator in the mid ’50s. The other factor is that many homesteaders lived several hours away from the store, so when they went shopping they bought enough to last for weeks or months.

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