24 thoughts on “Gone Forever

  1. Just helped my son change his headlight bulbs, clean his headlights and check the oil. Good thing. He spotted radiator fluid leaking.

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  2. My dad didn’t do engine work on the vehicles, but in the late 60’s-early 70’s, the HOURS AND HOURS AND HOURS I spent “helping” my dad replace mufflers and tailpipes on the family cars. I’ll bet we replace a muffler/tailpipe almost yearly on each vehicles

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  3. I guess that’s what led me to be an Engineer – my dad was very savvy, being a flight engineer/head mechanic on b-17’s, B-24’s, and B-29’s.
    My brother and I went far beyond him, we got into electronics at an early age (me at about 12), and fixing things just came naturally to me. I can think in three (now four) dimensions as easily as most people think in two… My brother went into programming, and even though I did also I went into hardware more deep then he did. I really enjoy robotics and associated fields, although the last 11 years of my work life was very deep in networking and network theory.

    But I sure remember hanging over the hood and watching my dad work on our ’55 Chevy station wagon. I was a very, VERY curious monkey.

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  4. My Dad never worked on cars, as he’d had enough of working on “dirty, oily, greasy machines” in the Navy. BUT….I worked on my own cars with my son, and now my grandson. The Little Guy doesn’t know what I’m doing, but he enjoys watching me do the work, and is fascinated by my two big rollers packed full of all kinds of tools.

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  5. I had to help my Dad re-build a 3.8 litre Jaguar engine which was fitted in a Mk.VII saloon. I was 14 years old. When we finished I knew about such esoterica as ‘torque’ and ‘tightening sequences’ and, most important of all, ‘how to tune and balance twin SU carburretors (that’s the correct English spelling, it IS a Jag we are talking about)’
    Then he taught me how to drive that gorgeous car. At 14 years of age.
    I learned about the concept of ‘mechanical sympathy’ and how to listen what the car was telling me.
    My Dad was a genius at bringing-up a son. I bless his memory every day.

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    • “My Dad was a genius at bringing-up a son. I bless his memory every day.” I don’t think a father could ever ask for a worthy praise and respect from his son then that. A damn fine eulogy.

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    • I learned how to tune dual carbs in the parking lot of my college frat house watching a guy work on his Triumph Spitfire. Fast forward 40 years…caught up with him, a senior engineering executive at a major aerospace company. I recounted the story and he started laughing…then said he still had the car!

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    • I called my GenX son the Dead End Kid because of his lack of sympathy with what the car was telling him. Damn shame, too, because he does actually have the natural mechanical talent passed down through both sides. He’s just not interested.

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  6. My son spent hours, even days with me working on cars, building stuff, and installing networks.

    He must have wrecked my car 4-5 times. Each time, we towed it to the house, took it apart and fixed it. I’m now an expert at camry/avalon front ends, struts, driveshafts. Each time, he helped. Each time, his mom taxed him and made him pay for the repairs.

    He knows to come over and plug my laptop when his engine light comes on. And we fix it.

    He’s not as good as me, yet, even though he’s in his 20s. Yet him and my daughters know that things can be fixed, and look to do that first.

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    • My only son is such a disappointment, he has NO mechanical aptitude nor electrical, nor computer. Matter of fact, he’s the head Cable Guy at a cable company in Central Illinois. Sigh. The nut fell a long way from the tree. My only Grandson is one year old, but his older sister is going places – she’s a tech person and she’s only 6! I need to take that girl under my wing.

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  7. I must have had the only Mom and Dad in the known universe who did not say “motorcycles are dangerous!” I guess they knew it would not do any good. Dad showed me how to remove busted off bolts in the aluminum cases of my first bike, a basket case. 50 years later I have his workbench we did the work on, made from oak packing crates from Pratt and Whitney. Money was tight- can’t just toss a oak pallet.

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  8. Pingback: Wednesday Linkage « Bacon Time !!!!!!

  9. Not completely gone Phil as examples pointed out above. My dad was never mechanical. I don’t know if it was by choice (mom) or not but Mr. Hendricks 2 houses over would let me come in and observe in his garage. I still observe in my garage today hands just a little greasier and dirty.

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  10. I grew up on the IH Farm Research Center in Hinsdale Ill back when there wasn’t anything but Farmall. Pop was one of the field mechanics and earlier did about everything else. Sure do miss those days growing up and it’s probably what started me don the mechanical everything path, Doesn’t matter what it is, if it’s mechanical, I’m interested… Maybe someone can correct me but the pic sure looks suspiciously like a Fiddy Six Chebby Apache to me…. Sure would like to hab=ve one of them now……..
    I’m thinkin that the fiddy’s and sixties were one of the optimal times to be growing up. And now here we are. Too Soon Old – Too Late Smart !

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    • I believe you are right. The truck having an Oregon plate sure could have been me and my dad, but it isn’t, dad would have owned a Dodge, a habit I could not break him of…

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  11. I have twin daughters who learned to work on cars because all I had was a beater that required work on many occasions. As things got better they mentioned they would like to have my tools so I split them up between them and bought them rollaways to keep them in. Next I bought them top boxes and large sets.
    Later on I bought replacements and they will be split up when I leave. Both girls do the repair work around their houses and on the vehicles that doesn’t require a computer setup. Once the problem is diagnosed they still do the hard part of replacement. Feels good to hear about the money they save on repairs. No calling plumbers most of the times either.
    jack

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