25 thoughts on “Stuff Nightmares Are Made Of

    • Cederq! are you assuming their identity!??!?! Why even a blind pig finds an acorn once in awhile!!!
      If you need any more dad advice; I’ll be sitting over in the corner shaking my head at those soy boys.

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      • Steve, are you assuming my age?!?!?! I am at least your age or older (62) so if I need “dad” advice, I will be swimming about fives miles off of the coast of Depoe Bay, Oregon. That is where we set his and my mothers ashes to sea… Now, if you want to swim with me, I need a fellow blogger brethren advice as to how to keep my head above water and how not to freeze in my sexy little Speedo I use to dazzle the girls.

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  1. We’re on our own well and we took precautions to make sure the wellhead didn’t freeze and all of our pipes are insulated. Once power came back on we’re right back on clean pure water from 400 feet deep in the Texas limestone while everyone is dealing with broken pipes and boil orders. When my sons went off to college their dorms and apartments were on city water and they were amazed at how much chlorine was in it. You get used to clean water and city water tastes like bleach. I occasionally have been known to indulge in a bourbon with a splash of water and the well water is a much better mixer. I think I’ll raise a toast to the poor lost souls at the Home Depot Plumbing aisle.

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    • The summer between Junior and Senior year in engineering school, I was extremely lucky to get a job as an engineering apprentice at the Great Northern Paper Mill in Miillinocket, Maine. Growing up I had light brown hair, not quite blonde. After that summer of showering and shampooing in the super chlorinated water, I was as blonde as blonde can be.

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  2. Did all of these folks gamble on the weather not getting below freezing? Did they all think, “insulation, heater tape, drain the pipes….NAH, it’ll be fine…”

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  3. Probably all trades dudes. More than likely helpers. Also depends on where it was in Dallas.

    The one near me in Richardson sported sparse shelves with a handful of yuppies gawping morosely at them, not sure what they needed to buy. The copper was pretty much wiped out of anything useful, like 1/2″ couplers or plugs. I wasn’t interested in that, since I hoard that shit. (Although I did buy more when I was there).

    The people that rebuild my house used a sharkbite elbow on the cold water feed to the washer, between the pex and existing copper. The plastic retaining ring let go and it failed.

    I had two pex 1/2″ adaptors, and one copper elbow 1/2″ to pex that I couldn’t find in my pile.

    So I bought 4 elbows. and some other pex connectors and sharkbites. I hoard that shit.

    Good thing that came out of all this is I also bought plastic bins and sorted all my parts so this doesn’t happen next time. Sure enough, the part I had popped up.

    I did pay it forward though. A neighbor on Nextdoor.com was hollering for 1/2″ couplers since all the stores were wiped out and he needed to get the water doing. I gave him two from my stash.

    https://inspectedbypat.com/2021/02/22/heat-is-discomfort-cold-is-pain/

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    • When I walked in the Home Depot and made my way to the plumbing aisle, there were a few ‘women of color’ here and there with shopping carts full of wood – 2×4 by like 18″. I thought WTF are they doing with that in this weather?

      Then it hit me. Burning it. They bought 2x4s and had them cut for firewood. Cheap pine. Wow. Wonder what a card lasts burning? An hour or two?

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  4. I am willing to bet that TX has very similar building codes to AZ. In 79 I lived in Phoenix for a year and watched Sun City West being built. The pipes were maybe 12 inches below ground and a slab was poured right over them, then the house erected. The crews were raising 30 to 40 houses a day, cookie cutter fashion in series production, dig, plumb, pour cement, raise house on down the street.

    Being from upstate NY and later spending 40 years in Michigan, any fule kno that you bury water lines at least 4 feet below grade if not deeper. Always used to marvel at what would happen in a hard freeze. Now we know.

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