Some Progress Anyway

I finally, finally, got a little time to myself and beat feet out to the garage to play a bit.

I started on it yesterday, got up right about Noon with the intention of running up to the hardware store for some countersunk bolts to start back in and of course, got side tracked yet again.

I had to swing by my Mom’s and that stopped everything.

I visited for a while, found out her lower back has been killing her, visited some more, then left to come home and grab a vibrating heating pad to take back up to her.

I don’t know exactly what time it was when I finally got back into the garage but it was after 4.

I started in on my little project and noticed it was downright chilly out there.

I have a small vintage space heater out there but I noticed a while back that the cord was getting hotter than shit after it had been on for even just a few minutes.

I took a look at the plug and didn’t really see anything out of the ordinary, plugged it into an extension cord and dropped it on the ground.

When it hit the ground I saw a spark come out the back side of the plug on the heater side.

Hmm, that can’t be good.

So I reached down and grabbed it up, unplugged it again and looked a little harder.

Bigger than shit I see the damn cord is cut on one leg. It is a flat cord with the three wires laying next to each other and connected by a thin layer of rubber.

One leg was almost cut clear in half underneath by the ground plug.

I didn’t see it the first time.

So I cut that damn thing off, stripped the wires and put a new plug on it. No more hot cord. Whaddya know, huh?

After all that crap I can finally get to what I was doing last night and now it is after 5.

I drilled and countersunk some holes, mounted up the piece and took a look. Oh yeah, I’m trying to upgrade my little horizontal band saw.

The vise on the thing has a really small traveling jaw so you can’t put short pieces in it.

IMG_20191228_170959

I found an upgrade on Youtube last year and am just now getting around to it.

IMG_20191228_170429

You can’t see it good but you can bet your ass there is a piece of scrap wood underneath that.

IMG_20191228_180914

I got that much done and decided I need to do the other side too.

That above is just a test fit, I had to slide the thing back a bit but you get the idea.

I just got done having dinner and am headed back out there to start in on the other side.

Theoretically, when I am done, those two pieces will wind up being right next to the saw blade when it is in the down position so I will be able to cut really short pieces if I need to.

When I get done with this part I am going to look into locating and drilling another hole for the stationary jaw so it can be turned to a 45 degree angle and bolted down again.

This is just one project out of a thousand but in the long run I can see where this might make some of those other ones easier to get done, if I ever have enough time to get to them in the first place.

UPDATE:

Well, that part is done anyway.

I see that I either drilled the holes a tiny smidgeon off or else the countersink moved things a bit when I went to test the thing after I was done putting it back together.

Take a look at how thin this piece is when I was testing it and cutting a piece of 5/16’s All Thread when I was done.

IMG_20191228_203746

When it was done cutting I snatched that thin piece up and measured the thickness on it, 0.195″.

As much as I badmouth those Chinese bastards for their crappy products sometimes, and they DO deserve it most of the time, every once in a while a guy gets lucky.

I wound up walking out the doors of Harbor Freight with that thing almost exactly one year ago for $185.00 after using a coupon and some gift cards. List price is $250.00

It made that cut using the blade it came with from the factory and using the factory settings. I have not had to touch the thing.

So this little upgrade is done now finally. On to the next big job.

IMG_20191228_205555

HMM.

I’m thinking I need to hit Youtube again after seeing that damn mess underneath there.

Maybe see if I can find a good way to mount some kind of Catch Pan under the sonofabitch to catch the chips and oil.

I was hitting it with some WD-40 to help it along.

I have about 3 gallons of vacuum oil out there they were going to dump out at work that I should be using for this kind of crap, I just have to find my oil can out in that mess.

More sorting and giving away is in order obviously.

I did find almost ten square inches of space in two different places from shit I got rid of recently.

It’s a start.

UPDATE 2;

OMFG, typical me.

I have literally been stepping over the solution to my catch pan problem for two days.

I don’t even remember where it came from but there has been a rusty old tin bread pan kicking around on the floor and I have been stepping right over it instead of just bending down and picking it up to get it out of my way.

It’s been sitting right next to the saw too.

I was sitting there studying the saw trying to figure something out when I spied it sitting there.

HMM, I wonder…

I grabbed it and stuck it underneath the thing and figured it would be perfect if I could just figure out how to mount it.

About ten minutes of that and it came to me.

MAGNETS.

I had some of those laying around in various places so I gathered them up, stuck them to the pan and done.

IMG_20191228_231011

One skinny one on each end and a bigger square one inside the front edge right in the middle.

Perfect.

Hell I even found my oil can while I was cleaning up.

What are things coming to?

 

13 thoughts on “Some Progress Anyway

  1. Now you need to be thinking on how to set up a way to get some cutting fluid on that thing.
    I have a great big ole Hyd-Mech that I use every day in my shop.
    That fluid helps extend the blade life as well as keeping the cuts straight.
    Makes for a faster cut as well.

    Like

      • I just thought of a slick solution for cutting solutions for light-duty
        applications. Some asshole deleted an old automatic oiling system
        on a pulper conveyor chain. The assholes in management were
        having us squirting oil on these 4-inch chains (about 80 feet in
        total x2.) Someone got a burr up their ass and came up with the
        bright idea of using a pump-up pesticide can to squirt the oil.
        Later, they burned out their brains trying to figure a way of doing
        it without removing the guards.

        At that time, the mill manager was an engineer. I reminded him
        that gravity-fed oilers have existed for about 150+ fucking years!
        A couple of tanks, valves, some tubing with brush spreaders
        were all available if he wanted to solve the problem. You can
        pick up a small capacity gravity feed oiler with a built-in
        adjusting valve, add a small brass shut off valve at the bottom
        and a bracket to hold it above the blade. That would be a
        pocket change purchase on Amazon or eBay.

        The dicks would pay man to spend over an hour pumping an
        oilcan till his hands hurt and the moment safety became an issue
        the morons could not find a solution!

        Like

  2. Most Excellent idea on the band saw vice! Have to put that one in the Ol’ shop notebook.
    Make a quick change V jaw set for holding pipe that have pins or cleats that drop into vertical aligned slots on the flat plates you machined? Two slots each plate so they hold rounds parallel and level to the saw blade or base?

    Like

    • Sometimes, the best tools are the ones you made yourself. Two
      of my homemade gizmos turned out to be quite useful. One was
      a non-destructive stud remover. The paper mill had a stock of
      bold couplings or barrel nuts as they are commonly called. I
      grabbed 2 each in 1/4, 5/16, 3/8, 1/2, and 5/8 inch. Add standard
      nuts and square head jackscrews. Screw the standard nut up
      and thread the barrel nut. Use the standard nut as a lock nut and
      crank it out. I have never seen barrel nuts in left-hand threads, but
      that would be even better as the jackscrew would tighten against the
      top of the stud.

      The other was an aid for precision shaft alignments. I bought a set
      of high-quality Nip impact sockets at Harbor Freight. They were so
      good that I bought a second set to replace a single socket I lost.
      I had a machinist chuck them up and cut the business ends down
      to 3/4 or 1″ in select sizes. I then drilled and tapped them for some
      all-thread. I then made up some body drilled tabs and added some
      nuts. Side alignments can be a bitch without adjusting tabs.
      Simply loosen the base bolts, put the socket head over them
      and start tightening the tabs against the motor feet to pull the
      motor into adjustment. The mechanical barbarians would beat
      the shit out of the motor feet with a heavy hammer. All I had to do
      was pull the motor by turning the nuts in.

      Liked by 1 person

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