One Thing I Definitely Won’t Have To Worry About With This Fucking Bronco

I started reading this and just busted out laughing. Apparently, this is a thing.

Some thing I won’t ever have to worry about either.

 

Erase your personal data first!

Selling Your Car?

courtesy of FTC


Is a new car in your future? You might first have some unfinished business with your old one. While you’re cleaning out your personal items, think about the personal information stored in the car’s electronic system.

Your car is a computer that stores a lot of information about you – just like your smartphone or home computer. When you sell or donate your car, that personal data might be accessible to the next owner if you don’t take steps to remove it.

Some cars have a factory reset option that will return the settings and data to their original state. But even after a factory reset, you may still have work to do. For example, your old car may still be connected to subscription services like satellite radio, mobile wi-fi hotspots, and data services. You need to cancel these services or have them transferred to your new vehicle.

Selling Your Car?

Here are types of data you want to remove from the electronic system before selling or donating your car:

  • Phone contacts and an address book may have been downloaded when you synced your phone with your vehicle.
  • Mobile apps’ log-in information, or data that’s gathered and stored on mobile apps, may be stored in the car.
  • Digital content like music may be stored on a built-in hard drive.
  • Location data like addresses or the routes you take to home, work, and favorite places may be stored in your navigation system.
  • Garage door codes for your home or office may be on your system.

Besides the information stored on your vehicle, check to make sure you’ve cleared connections between your devices and the car as well. For example, car manufacturers may provide an app that lets you control the car’s functions or find the car – you should disconnect the app from the car when you sell it or trade it in.

For more information about resetting and removing your information, check your owner’s manual, contact your dealer, and visit your vehicle manufacturer’s website.

Let’s see now.

1964 Austin Healey Sprite.

No computer, no electronic anything.

Check.

1983 GMC Caballero.

Has first generation GM engine control processor.

Fred Fucking Flintstone Primitive Technology.

Check.

1989 Ford Bronco.

On Board Diagnostics First Generation, EEC1, (Electronic Engine Control, First Version).

Also Fred Fucking Flintstone Primitive Technology.

Check.

Yep, looks like I’m good there too.

The wife’s rig is a 2004 Ford Focus.

OBDII, it does have power windows, remote capable power door locks too but none of the crap listed in the article.

Yeah, I don’t think I need to worry about any of that shit.

As a matter of fact, after going to college and getting Ford Factory trained, working on brand new luxury vehicles , complete piles of shit and everything in between for years, I actually have a real aversion to modern technology when it comes to vehicles.

Just for shits and giggles, if you are old enough to remember some of the old rigs, I used to have a 1961 Ford F-100 1/2 ton truck. I absolutely LOVED that old bastard.

When I bought it for $200 there was a hole in the block of the old 223 CID straight six engine you could stick a beer can through.

I found a wrecking yard engine for a couple hundred more and swapped it out.

It had a single barrel carburetor on it and had a 4 speed with a Granny Gear in it.

I kid you not, when I opened the hood on that old fucker, I could put a tool box up on the top of the inner fender on one side, a half a case of beer right next to that, climb up on that sonofabitch and slide down and stand right next to the engine and work on it.

Try THAT on one of these newer vehicles.

Tough?

Even with the short bed, I once hauled so many hay bales on that thing they were stacked over the top of the cab and then had a couple more stacked up ON THE CAB. I could only go about ten miles an hour.

I hauled some wet sand in it once for some friends and they shoveled so much into it that when I went to pull away, the front tires came off the ground, with three people in the cab.

I also had a 1963 Ford Falcon E-100 Window Van once that had a 250 CID straight six in it.

The engine was right next to you when you were driving and I could LITERALLY flip the engine cover up on the damn thing, twist the distributor around to adjust the timing a little on it, because I left the clamp a bit loose or fuck with the carburetor adjustments on it, WHILE DRIVING IT DOWN THE ROAD!

I could write a fucking book on all the shit that I went through with that rig and it is still talked about in my family during the holidays EVERY YEAR, thirty years later.

Shit, nowadays you open the hood on a vehicle and you can’t even SEE the engine on some of these rigs, they have a plastic cover over the whole thing.

You can’t hardly work on them either because they assemble the entire drive train on the sub frame at the factory and then shove it up into the car from underneath and bolt it in. Fuck You, consumer bitch, after that.

If someone GAVE me a brand new vehicle, unless it was some fancy Hot Rod sonofabitch, there would be a fight between me and the wife within ten seconds.

She would want me to get rid of every one of my rigs and keep it, I would be wanting to take it down and sell it then use the money to fix my old shit.

I kid you not, I often entertain the thought of selling that damn Caballero and setting out to find me another very early 60’s Ford pick up in half way decent shape.

Them things were simple as fuck and you couldn’t hardly kill them.

Just the way I like it.

18 thoughts on “One Thing I Definitely Won’t Have To Worry About With This Fucking Bronco

  1. My buddy inherited a ’63 Falcon wagon when his grandma passed.
    Paint was thin but no dents or rust. Good interior and chrome but the motor was tired.
    We replaced the 160 CI six with a rebuilt 220 short block and reused the factory head after a valve job. We found a 4-speed trans from a Mustang at the wrecking yard, and a pair of bucket seats from the same car. We bolted those in with very little trouble and ended up with a nice little ride for just a few bucks.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Very nice.
      I would love to have that. I have wanted a 61-3 Falcon since I was a teenager.
      A wagon or Ranchero would just be that much cooler.
      As a matter of fact, I may just start looking for one of those Ranchero’s again.

      Like

      • I forgot to mention the parts swap was possible because the early Mustang shared many parts with the Falcon.- running gear, brakes etc, even door handles.
        Lee Iacocca was a marketing genius. He turned a somewhat stodgy design into a head-turner and the rest is history. Priced a ’65 Mustang lately?
        It took GM years to break into the ponycar market.

        Like

  2. My favorite vehicle was a 1941 Dodge weapons carrier with a flat-head six, a four-speed tranny, 4 wd and with a high-low transfer case and a winch taken off a similar vintage 6×6. It had no doors and originally it had no roof.
    With chains on all four wheels it could climb a pole!
    I got it for $300, ran it to hell and back, then sold it for $500. I never should have sold it.

    Like

  3. My old truck was a 68 Chevy C-10 Stepside with a Stovebolt 6 and three on the tree, no AC or electric windows. You could also get in the engine compartment and work on it standing next to it. I hauled shit in it like you and had to have two buddies sit on the hood to keep the front wheels down on the road. Why do we keep getting rid of rigs like this and then pine for them years later?

    Like

  4. Ah, the indestructible 223 straight six.
    We had a 1960 Ranch Wagon with that and ‘three on the tree’ that not only hauled us (5) to Yellowstone, Florida, Canada and Washington DC 1961 thru 1964, but survived myself, my brother, and my sister learning to drive.
    It had 240K+ when Mom and Dad traded it in about 1969 on a 65 Chevy Bel-air, 235 straight six…

    Like

  5. I miss my 57 Chevy(s), I had the whole wiring harness memorized. Easy to tune, you could stand in the engine compartment if you removed the rock shield, and all the running gear from 1955 to 1963 were IDENTICAL. The windshields were a bear to replace, but other than that and a Wonderbar radio I constantly was rebuilding, these were a great car.

    I also used to race ’em, friend of mine had a ’56 straight 6 we used to put through it’s paces. interior totally stripped except for a bucket seat for the driver. Block was (re)built by Offenhauser, we used to do the quarter in about 9 seconds…

    Good times!

    Like

  6. Oh, yeah, I remember the old stuff really well. Points you could gap with a dime to get running again if the rubbing block was worn, carbs you could adjust by yourself, and an engine bay big enough to see the ground through.

    Like

  7. Guess you wouldn’t like my “2014” Ahem Dodge “bullshit” Charger, Totally electronic everything, 8.4 inch infotainment system, Beats by Dre surround sound. and so much more crap that I can’t even remember. On the plus side it is AWD with 370HP, 395 FT Pounds of torque. also a nearly 170MPH top speed.

    Good thing I still have my 1974 Chevy Nova. 350/350

    Like

  8. Hahahah! Thanks for that missive, I needed a good laugh today, which is day 4 of the nastiest flu type chest cold I have had in friggin’ years. Almost made it to 12 months without a cold or a sniffle, then BAM!. Thank the gods is is fading.

    But on the subject of modern cars, I picked up a 2015 Passat diesel (one of the nasty ones that were dumped by idiot owners over the so called cheating scandal). When connecting my phone to the on board system, I found the previous owners complete name, address and all his phone contacts on the telematics (this is what the Krauts call the core CPU that controls everytink). Have not figured out how to delete it yet, but you can be damned sure it will be wiped if/when I ever sell the beast. And yes, the 1952 MG and the 64 Mercedes have zero beyond spark and maybe a radio.

    Like

    • The wife went through all she could find on deciding what her new car would be. She ended up with a 2012 TDI.
      I put over $3500 in it for an A/C hose leak that had to be sent from the factory. Then the next summer it quit working again (this was about the time -thank God- that VW told us they’d buy the POS back.
      It also had those side tumblers for the ignition key that jammed unless you hosed the slot down with silicone WD.
      4 bad tire
      A bad battery that went out in the three years it was on the road.
      That’s in the two years we had it.
      Now she’s got a 2013 F-150…that’s been to the shop twice.

      Like

  9. My work truck was a 1974 Ford 100 van, three on the tree with a 240. I converted the trans to a C4 with a Hurst shifter and had a local forge make some 3/4 ton springs. The engine finally quit after 4 or 5 rebuilds, can’t remember which, and the frame was rusting, so it went to the yard. it was a good work rig.

    Like

  10. Back in ’12, I bought a used ’09 Explorer that had a real plush decor package (the Eddie Bauer model) – leather seats with bun warmers, DVD player for the back seat, Really upgraded. Came with the Microsoft Sync package (gen 1) that linked your phone to the car’s audio system so you can make hands off calls. The previous owner wasn’t real good at wiping the memories in that system. While cleaning it up, I found a record of his phone calls with names and numbers, and fallen behind the glove compartment was a paper service receipt with his name and address.

    Both electronic and paper trails.

    I have no interest in tracking down the guy, so I deleted it all. The advice to wipe the memories in your newer cars is solid advice.

    Like

  11. Ah, to have my old high tech ’64 Belvedere back. Space age push button automatic, (Lotsa fun changing the control cable, let alone finding one at the time) and state of the art factory dual point ignition to fire the 383.

    Like

  12. Still have my first truck 1962 F100 short bed unibody. My dad bought it in 67 $500. He and I rebuilt the engine 223 six and trans three on the tree. Gave it to me in 74. I put a 302 and c4 in it in 79.
    Drove that thing everywhere. Worst brakes ever. Need to restore it.

    Like

  13. My first car was a 4 door Ford Galaxy 500, with a 351 in it. It drove like a dream. Then, I got my uncle’s Gran Torino, that was 2 years newer. A 1973, in a beautiful sky blue, it also had the 351 engine, I think this one was a Cleveland block, not sure about the first one. I do know that my Gran Torino was fast. The only time I was beat from a stop at a light was by some guy in a Corvette. We took off, then he shifted into 2nd gear, and that was about the last I saw of him.
    But I have to say, Detroit is building some very reliable cars right now. I know that in years past, when you got over 100K miles on your car, you were starting to have to fix things. Now, the things are just getting broken in. Nearly every car built today will go 200,000 miles so long as you keep up with the maintenance that you should. That doesn’t mean that I would not love to have one or two of the older vehicles from my past still.
    And last year I bought my first truck ever. A 1995 Ford F 150, with 125,000 miles on it. A cab and a half, with 4 wheel drive. I bought it not because I needed it, but because I wanted it. Now, I love it, and would never want to be without a truck again. My wife has a Pontiac Torrent, which looks exactly like every other car out there, a 5 door hatchback, with the styling of an SUV, but not a 4 wheel drive. It is ok, but I have never been a car nut, anyway.
    For me, the car that performed best, by far, was the 1990 Plymouth Colt, that I bought brand new, right after a divorce. I was playing music and working in a foundry for a living, and needed a good gas mileage car. I got an actual 40 mpg with that car, without doing a single thing differently as far as how I drove it. It had a 1.5 Mitsubishi engine in it, but it was so light, that it was plenty of motor for the weight. A 5 speed manual transmission, it was great. The only problem was that I put 80,000 miles on it in 2 years, because of doing so much travelling for my day job and then my night job.

    Like

  14. First car was a 1960 Jeep Wagoneer. Stupid simple. I currently drive a 1996 suburban.

    Problem with the newer stuff is that the kinds of problems they have cost far more to fix than their ancestors. My 1991 3/4 ton suburban was my favorite and damn NYS salt for killing it. I bought it used from San Diego and drove it back from Colorado where the guy who was selling it had moved. Best damn Ebay deal I have ever done.

    My toy is an AM GENERAL M35A2C which is as simple as simple gets. Lots of fun tooling around in that.

    I figure my cutoff as to age of a car is about 1999. As soon as you get in the new century all that full electronic control stuff becomes the norm and fixing any of that is not cheap…..

    Like

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